'Poor Little Rich Girl'

Emily Nolan


THE ADORNMENT OF THE POOR LITTLE RICH GIRL

THOSE WHO LEAD AN EXTRAVAGANT LIFE DEEMED BY MOST TO ‘HAVE IT

ALL’ IS THE MOST PERFECT RENDITION OF MAKE-BELIEVE PLAY

AN ACTING ENSEMBLE ONLY PUBLICLY JUSTIFIED BY THE YOUTH OF KINDERGARTEN

A LIFE LACKING PEACE IS MASKED, OVERCOMPENSATING FOR DARKNESS

WRAPPING UP, BEAUTIFYING THE DAMAGED FACETS OF A LIFE LIVED IN THE SPOTLIGHT

MUCH TO THE ACTS OF LONELINESS WHEN GOD CREATED HUMANKIND, WE

CREATE SYNTHETIC SHIELDS EMBELLISHED WITH 

OSTRICH AND RHINESTONE

BECAUSE THE DEEPEST RIVERS RUN EVEN LOUDER ON OTHER DELTAS

THE HUMAN CONDITION’S HUMOROUS POKE AT PERFECTION

A GLASS SLIPPER FOR THE HEAVIEST OF FEET.


This collection was heavily inspired by Andy Warhol's Poor Little Rich Girl Saga, a series of films that explore the life of his muse, Edie Sedgwick. Poor Little Rich Girl looks at women in the limelight and their ability to adorn their broken lives with jewellery, extravagant clothing and accessories. I was also inspired by Martin Margiela's experimental pattern-making aesthetic and his use of his art form to challenge traditional techniques of making suggestions about society.

However, I will not label my collection ‘fashion’, as the word, for me, has been tarnished. ‘Fashion’ floods our online world with Instagram brands and 'fast fashion', and the majority of the Australian market that fits in this context insultingly rips off industry artisans. Many of these creations are made with little thought to the intellectual property of other designers. Thus, ‘fashion’, for me, is heavy with connotations of greed and narcissistic consumerism. It’s unfortunate that our everyday lives are plastered with the marketing schemes of this less-inspiring segment of the fashion design world.

I find that I explore my mind best when creating for the body. I also believe garment design and construction can be just as thought-provoking and expressive as art in other mediums, such as photography and painting, as it comes from somewhere within. Much like drawing, it is a silent instinct between the mind and the hands as they work away in unison to turn the dreaming into a tangible object.

Like Margiela and Warhol, humour will always play a role in my work. I like to laugh at how seriously I take myself. Considering the materials I chose—wool cashmere, digitally printed silk organza, leather and a shitload of ostrich feathers—my models Cece and Brigette really should've turned out looking like sheep in drag. Also, these shots of @cecefloden and @brigetteclark_ were taken on an iPhone. I'm not sorry about it.


The Collective